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  • EPILOBIUM ANGUSTIFOLIA - Fireweed
  • EPILOBIUM ANGUSTIFOLIA | Fireweed Range Map

EPILOBIUM ANGUSTIFOLIA | Fireweed

$0.00
SKU:
EPI-ANG

Product Description

Fireweed, Blooming Sally, Blooming Willow, Fire-top, French Willow Herb, Great Willow Herb, Persian Willow, Purple Rocket, Wickup, Wicopy"

The roots were used to wash swellings and as a poultice for boils. Chippewas used fresh or dried leaves made moist as a poultice for bruises or splinters. Western Indians scooped the pith from the stems to eat raw, cook as a thick soup or bake into breads. New shoots were eaten raw or cooked like asparagus.

Epilobium from the Greek meaning "upon or above the pod" referring to the manner in which the flowers keep blooming above the seed pods as they develop lower on the flower spike. Angustifolium comes from the Latin for "narrow leaf".

The roots were used to wash swellings and as a poultice for boils. Chippewas used fresh or dried leaves made moist as a poultice for bruises or splinters. Western Indians scooped the pith from the stems to eat raw, cook as a thick soup or bake into breads. New shoots were eaten raw or cooked like asparagus.

Sun Exposure               Prairie, Savanna
Soil Moisture Wet Mesic, Mesic, Dry Mesic
Bloom Time Summer
June, July, August
Bloom Color Pink
Max Height 4 feet
Wetland Code FAC
Germ Code  C(60),D
Seeds Per Packet  500
Seeds Per Ounce   500,000

 

Edible Uses: Leaves and young shoot tips - raw or cooked. They can be used in salads or cooked as a vegetable. When boiled they make a wholesome vegetable and are a good source of vitamins A and C. Only use the leaves when they are young. Although they are said to be edible, another report says that an infusion of them can stupefy. Young shoots - cooked. They make a good asparagus substitute. Root - raw, cooked or dried and ground into a powder. Used in spring, it has a sweet taste. Flower stalks - raw or cooked. Added to salads, they are used when the flowers are in bud. The pith of young or older stems - raw or cooked. Slightly sweet, tender and pleasing to eat, though there is not much of it. Gelatinous, it can be used as a flavouring in soups. The stems are said to be a good laxative, but are best not eaten on an empty stomach. A tea is made from the dried leaves, it is sweet and pleasant. Called 'kaporie' tea in Russia, it contains 10% tannin. The leaves are also used as an adulterant of China tea.

Medicinal Uses: Willow herb is often used as a domestic herbal remedy, though it is little used in conventional herbalism. The herb is antispasmodic, astringent, demulcent, emollient, hypnotic, laxative and tonic. It is used in the treatment of diarrhoea, mucous colitis and irritable bowel syndrome. The plant is used in Germany and Austria to treat prostate problems. A poultice of the leaves is applied to mouth ulcers]. An extract of the leaves has anti-inflammatory activity. An ointment made from the leaves has been used to soothe skin problems in children.

A tea made from the leaves and roots is a folk remedy for dysentery and abdominal cramps.

A poultice made from the peeled roots is applied to burns, skin sores, swellings, boils etc.

Other Uses: A fibre obtained from the outer stems is used to make cordage. 

Herbal Uses: Unknown

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